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D--WEB ENTERPRISE SERVICE TECHNOLOGY PRIME

Solicitation Number: NNH12424505L
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Office: Headquarters
Location: Office of Procurement (HQ)
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NNH12424505L
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Added: Feb 06, 2012 9:17 am
This notice is issued by NASA Headquarters Procurement Office on behalf of theOffice of Chief Information Officer (OCIO) to post a draft Statement of Work (SOW) viathe internet and solicit responses from interested parties. Interested parties areinvited to submit a statement of capability outlining past work that is related to thisrequirement. This procurement is in part a follow-on to NASAs existing Web services contract witheTouch Systems administered by NASA Headquarters. The work will be performed at locationsyet to be determined and may include NASA facilities and offsite locations.The procurement is one of the five (5) acquisitions under NASAs IT InfrastructureIntegration Program (I3P), which will integrate business processes and information acrossorganizational lines efficiently and securely. Information regarding all of theseprocurements can be found at: http://i3p.nasa.gov . Background: Since its establishment, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (alsoreferred to as the Government or the Agency) has continued to evolve as a result ofchanging missions and priorities. Similarly, NASAs Information Technology (IT)infrastructure is evolving toward a level of maturity towards a seamless and trulyintegrated IT architecture. NASA recognizes that effectively and efficiently creating,researching, managing, preserving, protecting, and disseminating the information requiredto achieve the objectives of research and space exploration, as well as other NASAmissions, is vital to mission success. NASA considers its Web presence and services vital to its continuing success as the worldleader in aeronautics, space exploration, and scientific research. NASAs Web sites andservices help fulfill the agencys statutory requirement to disseminate information aboutits programs to the widest extent practicable. To external audiences, NASAs Webcapabilities provide direct access to agency programs and information, allowing them toparticipate in the excitement of research and exploration. Internally, NASA personnel useWeb sites and services to support NASAs core business, scientific, research, andcomputational activities. It is imperative that secure and cost-effective Web servicesare delivered to meet NASA mission and program needs while achieving efficiency and highlevels of customer satisfaction.WEB Services Goals and Objectives:The NASA Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) has established the followingprinciples to guide tactical decisions and planning now and in the future:MISSION ENABLING: IT at NASA serves to enable NASA's mission. INTEGRATED: NASA will implement IT that enables integration of business (mission)processes and information across organizational boundaries. EFFICIENT: NASA will implement IT to achieve efficiencies and ensure that IT isefficiently implemented. SECURE: NASA will implement and sustain secure IT solutions. In direct support of these key principles, the following NASA IT goals and specific webservices objectives were established for the NASA Web Strategy:Goal 1: Transform NASAs IT infrastructure and application services to better meetevolving stakeholder needs and support mission successObjectives:Work with missions in understanding and meeting their web needsAdopt services in close cooperation with customer baseDeploy solutions that are standards based and interoperableQuickly adopt industry proven technologies and practicesGoal 2: Enhance and strengthen IT Security and Cyber security to ensure the integrity,availability, and confidentiality of NASAs critical data and IT assets.Objectives:Provide a secure, shared web infrastructure and environmentProvide guidance in coding standards and libraries that minimize security risksPerform periodic scans of web assets to assess vulnerabilitiesCollaborate with NASA Security Operation Center to improve security of core web platformProvide standardized, coordinated rapid response to Web Security issues.Goal 3: Identify, test, and adopt new information technology that will make NASAsmissions more capable and affordable.Objectives:Increase cost efficiencies by using shared servicesPrototype innovative technologiesLeverage open source to drive down cost of softwareMigrate services to cloud, where practical and cost effectivePartner with private industry to provide services that are innovative and secureGoal 4: Provide enterprise resources and processes that foster mission success and allowNASA to attract and retain a highly performing IT workforce.Objectives:User friendly and self servicedEmploy the latest technologies that missions needBalance autonomy and governanceCreate and utilize agile contractual vehiclesWEB Environment Current State:NASA is comprised of 10 Centers plus several satellite facilities that are geographicallydistributed throughout the United States. Each Center generally is designing or operatingone or more missions or programs. Often, each of these endeavors has its own webinfrastructure that is used internally within the mission or program for collaborationamongst the NASA workforce and externally with academia and industry partners. Frequently, custom web applications are built to assist in the design or operation ofthese missions. In addition, missions will often publish information to the public underits own auspices. These sites are extremely diverse, in that they have a wide variety ofaudiences, uses and technologies. The different requirements for these services haveresulted in a Web environment that is highly autonomous but inconsistent in terms oftechnology, management, security and information search capabilities. In addition,cross-functional services such as enterprise search are unavailable and complex toimplement.In spite of this large, fragmented Web presence, NASAs main point of entry iswww.nasa.gov . The current configuration of www.nasa.gov is shown in Figure 1 (Note: AllFigures posted to this announcement under WESTPRIME RFI Figures).Content is made available using a proprietary content management system (CMS). Contentfollows a standard editorial workflow. In addition to the portal, the current vendorprovides other services:1. Wiki2. Blog3. Polling/Voting4. Chat5. Video Streaming6. Social Media7. Searchwww.nasa.gov attracts 600,000 unique visitors per day with an average of 43 million hitsper day and an average network traffic of 1.29 TB per day.The current vendor also provides development and hosting of approximately 140 internaland external web applications and websites, which are developed using various technologystacks. Some of the technologies used are proprietary or heavily customized. WEB Services Target State:The target state for web services is to provide a consistent, capable and agile,cloud-based enterprise infrastructure that provides Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS),Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Software as a Service (SaaS) for internal and externalweb applications and sites using an interoperable, standards-based and secureenvironment. All web content development and web application development will be doneusing other support contract vehicles. Vendors will provide the Cloud Broker Role asdefined in NIST Special Publication 500-292 NIST Cloud Computing ReferenceArchitecture. http://www.nist.gov/manuscript-publication-search.cfm?pub_id=909505 To achieve the goals above, the NASA OCIO will offer a diverse set of services (Figure2). By offering many choices, NASA OCIO will provide an incentive to the NASA communityfor using this shared service model. The OCIO will also ensure that the selected toolsadhere to a set of guiding principles and standards that meet the OCIO application andweb services goals. Guiding principles are as follows:1. We will strive for vendor independence through the use of open source software. 2. We will prefer COTS, GOTS and Open Source solutions over custom built solutions.This includes cloud offerings. 3. Open standards based solutions will be utilized over closed proprietarysolutions.4. All applications will expose their data and functionality through serviceinterfaces.5. At a minimum, data access services should be provided by RESTful technologies.6. Applications that require authentication will integrate with Agencyauthentication services.In terms of the exact nature of the services, the OCIO anticipates providing severalchoices in each of the service areas. A sample depiction of possible platforms to beoffered is shown in Figure 3. Software services should include multiple choices for CMS,Video Streaming, and Collaboration etc. Figure 4 illustrates how the requirements in the SOW will integrate into the NASAEnterprise Web Environment.Questions:Interested parties are requested to submit a statement of capability outlining past workthat is related to this requirement. The statement of capability shall include:appropriate documentation and references as well as examples of the following: Note: Page limitation is NTE 30 pages for the 19 questions below. The page limitationdoes not include graphics and/or illustrations1. How would the vendor approach developing cost models that promote incrementalgrowth in the use of areas such as bandwidth, storage, and infrastructure?2. How would the vendor approach teaming arrangements to fulfill the requirements?3. How would the vendor approach developing pricing calculators for cloud deploymentof the services illustrated in Figure 2.4. How would the vendor approach reporting requirements for utilization statistics,metrics, and deliverables? 5. How would the vendor approach enable NASA Centers and Mission Directorates tofocus on content and application development?6. How would the vendor approach satisfying different Service Level Agreement (SLA)requirements? For example some web sites may require an availability of 99.995% whileothers may require 99.95% or 99.5%.7. How would the vendor approach backup/restore from the cloud? Include, how wouldthe vendor architect a solution that could restore an environment to full operations,with the lowest mean time to recovery, mean time between failures, medium unplannedoutage length.8. How would the vendor approach architecting the database service for cloudoptimization? What innovative technologies could be architected into the PaaS? 9. How would the vendor approach interfacing to Agency services such as imap,authentication or other internal services?10. How would the vendor approach facilitating the use of different CMS (such as, butnot limited to, Alfresco, Drupal and Wordpress) to publish to the same portal? 11. How would the vendor approach ensuring cloud interoperability and portability?12. How would the vendor approach monitoring for compliance (security, accessibility,and other Federal mandates)?13. How would the vendor approach adequate and industry standard SLAs) within eachlayer (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS) of the cloud?14. How would the vendor approach compliance with Federal Risk AuthorizationManagement Program (FedRAMP) requirements as they become mandatory?15. How would the vendor approach architecting a solution that required high volumenews environment support that supported 750 users with 100 simultaneous users that had acontent base of 700,000 documents, updates of 10,000 a month with peaks of 200 updatesper hour? The infrastructure should support 15 gbps and web streaming of 500 gbps.16. How would a vendor approach an enterprise-class, federated search capability thatwould give users access to millions of documents in widely distributed, differentlystructured collections that integrate search metadata recommendations, comments andratings?17. How would a vendor handle the bandwidth needed to serve NASAs Web content? Thecurrent baseline bandwidth is 900 mbps, which has been growing consistently and will needto grow more rapidly as more content is consolidated into the nasa.gov infrastructure.NASAs bandwidth usage also spikes during high-visibility events (historically, up to 60gigabits per second; this is expected to increase with each event).18. How would the vendor market this environment to the NASA community?19. How would the vendor approach transition from the existing infrastructure andcontract into the new contract and environment?Feedback to the Draft SOWThe Government is also seeking input on the draft SOW to validate that the SOW willdeliver the services illustrated in Figure 2. There is no page limitation on thisfeedback to the Draft SOW.The Government will use the information provided as recommended inputs that will lead theGovernment to develop a comprehensive procurement strategy and to develop a resultingsolicitation. Any information used will be on a non-attribution basis. Restrictions thatwould limit the Governments ability to use the information for these purposes are oflimited value to the Government and are discouraged.This Request for Information (RFI) is for information and planning purposes and is not tobe construed as a commitment by the Government nor will the Government pay forinformation solicited. Respondents will not receive feedback on the information obtainedthrough this RFI process.RFI responses must be directed to the point of contact listed below and submitted nolater than 3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on March 6, 2012. Responses should besubmitted via e-mail. The response format is 8.5" x 11", 12 pt, Times New Roman font. NASA is seekingcapabilities from large businesses, as well as from small, small disadvantaged, smalldisadvantaged veteran-owned, and women-owned small businesses for the purposes ofdetermining the appropriate level of competition. In addition to the aforementioned, responses shall also include a cover page thatincludes the following (limited to 1 page, formatted as above): name and address offirm, size of business, average annual revenue for past 3 years and number of employees,ownership, whether business is large, small, small disadvantaged, 8(a), HUBZone, smallsmall disadvantaged veteran-owned (SDVOSB), and/or woman-owned; number of years inbusiness; affiliate information: parent company, joint venture partners, potentialteaming partners, prime contractor (if potential sub) or subcontractors (if potentialprime); and point of contact position, address and phone number.Any referenced notes may be viewed at the following URLs linked below.
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Draft Statement of Work

Type:
Other (Draft RFPs/RFIs, Responses to Questions, etc..)
Label:
Draft Statement of Work
Posted Date:
February 6, 2012

WESTPRIME RFI Figures

Type:
Other (Draft RFPs/RFIs, Responses to Questions, etc..)
Label:
WESTPRIME RFI Figures
Posted Date:
February 6, 2012
:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA Headquarters Acquisition Branch, Code210.H, Greenbelt, MD 20771
:
Cedric Maurice Mitchener, Contracting Officer, Phone 301-286-6162, Fax 301-286-0357, Email Cedric.M.Mitchener@nasa.gov

Cedric Maurice Mitchener