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Mechanisms of Behavior Change Initiation (MOBCI) for Drinking Behavior

Solicitation Number: NIAAA-09-07
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
Office: National Institutes of Health
Location: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, R&D Contracts Management Branch
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NIAAA-09-07
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Presolicitation
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Added: Mar 03, 2009 2:04 pm
The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) intends to issue a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) entitled “Mechanisms of Behavior Change Initiation (MOBCI) for Drinking Behavior.” NIAAA is soliciting proposals for new, high risk approaches to traditionally intractable alcohol-related problems through the development of mechanism-based strategies that induce maladaptive drinkers to initiate and sustain a change from maladaptive drinking behaviors towards more healthful drinking behaviors. NIAAA is looking for opportunities that will result in entirely new or quantum improvements in both the theory and methodologies used to understand how to induce sustainable, positive change in maladaptive drinkers. Although the long-term goal of this initiative is to develop strategies for sustained, positive drinking behavior change, this BAA focuses on the initiation of change as an initial step towards this goal. However, if suitably justified, this BAA does not discourage proposals that incorporate theory and approaches that look at both initiation and maintenance of positive drinking behavior change.



This BAA is soliciting proposals for two types of projects, denoted by Category A: MOBCI Research Projects and Category B: MOBCI Coordinating Center.



Category A: MOBCI Research Projects. The present BAA is soliciting proposals for innovative, foundational, systems-oriented research aimed at diagnostically relevant, quantitative, mechanism-based, dynamical models of drinking behavior. The purpose of this BAA is to inform the design of strategies to cause initiation of sustainable, positive drinking behavior change. Of particular interest is breakthrough research that uncovers and explicates the mechanisms and associated “controllable variables” underlying such change, at the following three levels of observation and analysis:

• Neurophysiologic factors: individual neurophysiology and relevant biology,

• Intrapersonal (e.g., cognitive, psychological, affective and behavioral) factors, and

• Immediate interpersonal factors: individual immediate social ecology (e.g., family, friends).



Multi-level, multi-scale mechanisms are an emphasis area for this BAA.



Category B: MOBCI Coordinating Center. In order to accomplish MOBCI’s goals, NIAAA expects that there will be a need to support the incorporation and use of advanced analytic and modeling methods among Category A projects. The transdisciplinary integration of existing and new databases is of particular note in this context. NIAAA seeks to actively foster collaboration and sharing of approaches and data sources in order to enhance both the immediate success of all participants and the long-term contributions of MOBCI. Hence, Category B calls for proposals that would provide significant collaboration, archival, integration, and analysis services for the Category A projects.



NIAAA anticipates awarding multiple contracts based on technical merit, availability of funds, and programmatic balance. NOTE: In contracts awarded as a result of this BAA, the Statement of Work will be proposed by the offeror and negotiated and accepted by the Government.

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5635 Fishers Lane
Room 3016, MSC 9304
Bethesda, Maryland 20892-9304
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Matthew L Packard,
Chief, NIAAA CMB
Phone: 301-443-3041
Fax: 301-443-3891
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Patricia N. Hanacek,
Contract Specialist
Phone: 301-594-6226
Fax: 301-443-3891